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Whatever’s On TV Recap: Being Human, Children Shouldn’t Play with Undead Things

18 Mar

Have I mentioned just how much I am hooked on Syfy’s “Being Human?” No, well, I am, and this weeks episode pretty much cemented my feelings. Now, I don’t always believe that every show about supernatural beings needs to be scary, but come on, there should be a slight spookiness to the proceedings. That’s one aspect I feel the show has been lacking due to the heavy emphasis on angst. Did last nights “Children Shouldn’t Play with Undead Things” change that? Well read on to find out.

Sally

Sally is still feeling lost and alone, despite rooming with Aiden and Josh, especially after her last confrontation with the ex (I despise him, so I won’t say his name just right now.) She wants answers, and Aiden thinks he knows where she can find some. He takes her to an older section of the hospital, and after boring her with the history, tells her that the wing is haunted with other ghosts. He won’t go in with her, because well, he put more than a few of them there. I think this was the first time I had ever been spooked by the show. Just watching the other ghosts gave me chills, and the green writing was an effective touch. Apparently, Sally is creeped out just as much, and retreats to give Aiden a piece of her mind.

Best Sally Moment: Telling Aiden where she would stick a wooden stake in him, before being interrupted by Josh.

Josh

Josh is also lonely, but has decided to not be as pro-active as Sally, baiscally because he does not want to expose anyone to what he is. That goes especially for Nora, who Josh sees on a “date” with a handsome doctor. However, Josh gets a second chance, which is almost hilariously ruined by a pissed off Sally, thanks to his wonderful awkwardness.

Josh is hesitant to go, but Sally insists that he needs to live, and would trade places with him in heartbeat (you know, if she had one.) The date goes well up until things get hot and heavy, when werewolf Josh lets out a little growl and flees. You would think that any other woman would be turned off, but not Nora. She corners just on one of his changing nights, and the two have a very brief, yet intense encounter (this is the one time I can honestly say “True Blood” could eat it’s heart out.) He runs out again, quickly running out of time, and goes home to complete the change. Sally refuses to leave him and realizes the kind of personal hell he is actually going through.

Best Josh Moment: As if changing into a werewolf weren’t enough, Josh still manages to get Aiden to save the TV and cover himself in front of Sally. I also know that he can’t actually hurt her, but I was still at the edge of my seat the whole time, and when he went at her, I actually jumped.

Aiden

Aiden has made a new friend after saving a 10 year old boy from a pair of bullies. Aiden is reluctant to look after Bernie, but after a few flashbacks to when he was a father, he warms up to the idea. The two become very close, even bonding to “Evan Almighty,” but there is still a dark side to Aiden that can’t be ignored. He still has the “movie” Rebecca made him, and watches it like a teenager discovering the Internet for the first time. After Aiden sends Bernie to his room for some “Three Stooges” DVD’s, we all can figure out what will happen, even before Bernie’s mom (who made a play for Aiden before) tells him to stay away.

Best Aiden Moment: Bernie cuts his hand, but Aiden manages to control himself in another tense moment from the episode.

Now this is what I am talking about. I feel the writers have finally really reigned in the tone, and created what is now appointment TV for me. Say what you want about the superiority of the BBC version (which I have yet to see, but plan to once this one is over) but I believe that Syfy’s version is finally delivering the total package: laughs, thrills, and chills. I could not ask for anything more.

What did you think of “Children Shouldn’t Play with Undead Things?”

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Posted by on March 18, 2011 in Uncategorized

 

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